Home > Senior Fiction, Young Adult > The Divorce Diaries by Sarah Quigley

The Divorce Diaries by Sarah Quigley

May 30, 2020

divorceThe Divorce Diaries by Sarah Quigley. Pub. Vintage imprint PenguinRandom House, 2020.

I bought this book for my wife after reading an article in the Sunday Times and decided to read it myself. I am very glad I did. It is beautifully written, full of feeling and emotion and best of all it is a profile of life in one of the great cities of the World, Berlin.

Leaving a relationship is a process and this six part book goes through the process from love is blind, marriage and all that it promises, through to separation, learning to live alone, becoming open to other relationships and finally contentment and acceptance.

It is compelling reading and the beauty of it is, you never know the husband’s name nor the identity of any of Sarah’s other relationships. You know her women friends first names and some of them are brilliant, but she spills the beans on no-one although in Berlin she runs into many famous people.

Divorce is always messy and it’s always different. The emotion attached to divorce according to Sarah is disappointment first, with anger a close second. It builds up in her like lava in a volcano but she gets through it.

Her Swedish husband couldn’t handle alcohol and became violent. For 360 days a year he was fine but when he drank no woman should have to put up with what he meted out. Sarah loved him and probably still does and it hurt her deeply to have failed although she in my eyes never failed.

The process of getting her life back is compelling reading. Her first relationship after the Swede was on holiday in Greece “where self confident girls in sexy red bikinis stand thigh deep in turquoise water, tossing back their salt-spray manes and taking selfies“.

her second is with a 50 year old German she calls Ad Man who has the sexual stamina of a 20 year old and the investment portfolio of a wealthy octogenarian.

It is not easy and it takes her a while to appreciate aloneness without feeling acutely alone. Sarah gets there by the end of the book, it is riveting.

For anyone with relationship problems and decisions to make. How about this for perception “sometimes divorce rids you of friends who were never real friends in the first place”

%d bloggers like this: