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Archive for the ‘Humorous Stories’ Category

Bad Dad by David Walliams. Illus. Tony Ross

December 2, 2017 Comments off

bad dadBad Dad by David Walliams. Illus. Tony Ross. Pub. HarperCollins, 2017.

You don’t need to advertise these novels kids all know about them as soon as they are out.

The usual smattering of silliness which you wish was true, with goodies taking on baddies and winning. This time we have a bad dad who isn’t bad, a vicar without a congregation, a mini called Queenie, an aunt who can’t write poetry and three villains-Mr Big, Fingers and Thumbs who are just classic and right out of a Jimmy Cagney movie.

The down trodden are 11 year old Frank and his stockcar driving father Gilbert who losses a leg, a wife and his self respect but not the love of his son.

The minor characters are a treat especially the local copper Sergeant Scoff and perennial newsagent and all round good guy if a little mingy, Raj.

Great for anyone with a silly sense of humour and especially for reluctant readers. As usual Tony Ross’s illustrations are superb.

I loved it. But wait there’s more. We have a gay relationship to ponder and it will make you happy.

Father Christmas’s Fake Beard by Terry Pratchett.

November 7, 2017 Comments off

Fake beardFather Christmas’s Fake Beard by Terry Pratchett. Pub. Penguin Random House, 2017.

If you have ever been out gathering winter few-ooo-well in front of good king Wencelas or sang a partridge in a Pearrrrr Treeeee, then you will love this collection of Christmas seasonal stories by the late Terry Pratchett.

If anybody can wring humour out of Christmas it is our Terry. He even puts Father Christmas on trial for public disturbance in which he pleads not guilty On the Grounds of diminished Existence. His first witness is a 7 year old boy who testifies “Everybody knows it’s just your mum or dad buying presents”.

There are other stories too including the Abominable Snow Baby and the people of Blackbury who make the biggest pie ever.

Easy to read, big font and super silly stories. What fun!!

I Need a New Bum and other stories by Dawn McMillan, Illus. Ross Kinnaird.

October 30, 2017 Comments off

new bumI Need a New Bum and other stories by Dawn McMillan, Illus. Ross Kinnaird. Pub. Oratia, 2017.

Three short illustrated stories in rhyming text on the poo, bum wees theme that are certain to attract reluctant primary and intermediate readers particularly boys.

Many people are not happy with their bums and when a boy discovers a crack in his, he wonders how it got there and considers a range of replacements with great hilarity. It’s not permanent though as he discovers that his father has the same crack. Don’t we all?

Seagull Sid plots to get all the humans off his beach in the way that seagulls always have, only with accuracy and persistence. Once again great hilarity all round.

Doggy Doo on my Shoe is more of a city problem especially if you walk in the suburbs. People are not careful or respectful with their dogs and doggy doo on the shoe is a common sight and smell. Once again great hilarity with Ross Kinnaird’s illustrations hitting the funny bone with regularity.

Expelled by James Patterson & Emily Raymond.

October 23, 2017 Comments off

expelledExpelled by James Patterson & Emily Raymond. Pub. Penguin Random House, Imprint Young Arrow, 2017

This novel for teens had me laughing from start to finish. It is clever, it is witty and the dialogue between characters is buzzing. If you are a reluctant reader get your eyeballs into this novel, I guarantee you won’t put it down.

The brief plot is – someone has put a revealing photograph using the IP address of 16 year old Theo’s Twitter account. For this he is expelled from school along with those that featured in the photograph. He is innocent.He is aggrieved and wants justice and has to convince the others that they must pursue the truth. They decide to do it by making a film about the incident and the outcome is superb. But be warned it brings out truths that you may not be ready for.

Theo is unhappy and doesn’t want to be known as the kid with the dead father who was expelled. He has a crush on Sasha in a way that is a cross between like and lust.

Sasha is an intelligent and aloof beauty. When she says anything the boys sit up and notice. When the movie is suggested by Theo the boys take it seriously because of Sasha who herself has been expelled for alleged theft. There is also some thought that she is the girl with the impressive boobs in the photo on Theo’s Twitter page.

Jude is Theo’s best friend and is assumed to be in the photograph too. He describes himself as a 16 year old bisexual virgin in a Hello Kitty T shirt and plans to paint himself to success and happiness with his art.

Parker is a 200 pound football player with the intelligence and language skills of an ox, who was also a subject on the photograph. He was swigging from a whisky bottle with a hand on the afore mentioned boobs.

Felix is the film maker moved by the fact that the film Tangerine was  shot on iPhone 5’s. Can he do it with this story and get to Sundance film festival?

Great cover. You see this cover and you want to pick the book up. It’s a rivetting story get into it.

 

 

 

Birthday Boy. What if it was every Day? by Davis Baddiel.Illus. Jim Field

October 9, 2017 Comments off

birthday boyBirthday Boy. What if it was every Day? by Davis Baddiel. Illus. Jim Field. Pub. HarperCollins, 2017.

It is often said that if you see a shooting star you should make a wish and it will come true and wouldn’t it be great if it was your birthday every day. Combine these two ideas and you have an outline of the plot of this book.

This all happens to Sam Green and while he enjoys it for a while he soon learns that it is not all beer and skittles. It is all a bit selfish and imposes hardship on family and friends especially his younger sister Ruby who is the feel good character in this book.

Then Sam decides he doesn’t want his birthday every day and his Grandpa Sam who suffers from dementia goes missing. Is there a link? A gripping adventure follows as Sam and Ruby try to reverse the wish and find grandpa.

Very much written in the style of David Walliams and why not it is a winning formula.

Jim Field’s illustrations play a starring role in this novel but for me the best parts involved the four grandparents who squabbled and battled throughout.

This book will appeal to reluctant readers with great sense of humour and imagination and of primary and intermediate age. Get it it is a laugh.

Charlie and his amazing tales by Dawn McMillan, illus. Ross Kinnaird

October 6, 2017 Comments off

CharlieCharlie and his amazing tales by Dawn McMillan, illus. Ross Kinnaird. Pub. Oratia Books, 2017.

Charlie is a dog in need of a new owner and has to sell himself. A young impressionable boy passes by sees the $10.00 sale price and is interested. Charlie sees his chance and rips off a series of amazing stories that only a shaggy dog could tell.

Charlie talks of being a spy, of saving people from flood and fire, of surviving hungry crocodiles and more. He is especially keen to pass himself off as toilet trained, neat and tidy, and having a good imagination.

The boy is sold but is it all true? Check out the ending to see if the boy parts with his $10.00.

Excellent fun from these two experienced writers and illustrators. The rhyming text is not forced and makes for easy reading aloud and the illustrations boost Charlie’s tall tales.. The dog sitting on the loo will bring a few laughs.

A fun publication for the school library and for parents to read to their children at home.

Categories: Humorous Stories Tags: ,

Annual 2. A New Zealand Miscellany edited by Kate De Goldi & Susan Paris.

September 18, 2017 Comments off

annual 2Annual 2. A New Zealand Miscellany edited by Kate De Goldi & Susan Paris. Imprint Annual Ink. Distributed, Potton & Burton, 2017.

Reading this book made me very happy. I smiled all the way through it and in parts laughed out loud. What’s more it is totally New Zealand and although aimed at the 9-13 year olds, it really is for everybody.

It is loosely based on the annual type compilations that appeared through the 50’s and 60’s but it is better than that, there is a bit of depth about the subject matter and the means of delivery.

It has stories, essays, interviews, poems, comics, a song by Bic Runga, a recipe, a game and art works. Wait there is more, it is full of ideas for any young writer to get inspiration from and it is totally brilliant.

To give you an example one article looks at a community notice board that you will find in a supermarket or library. Folk offering services or requesting help. It then creates communication between the different players whether by design or accident, via email or texting by cell phone. The results are hilarious.

The article that really tickled me was titled Never say Goodbye: The Art of taxidermy. Tongue is firmly placed in the cheek.

Just loved it. You will too. Look at the part story of an old NZ classic, Barry Faville’s The Keeper – just superb.