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Posts Tagged ‘Diaries’

My NZ Story Harbour Bridge by Philippa Werry.

February 24, 2015 Comments off

harbour bridgeMy NZ Story Harbour Bridge by Philippa Werry. Pub. Scholastic, 2014.

More than just a story of the making of the bridge, it is a social history of the years 1958/1959 that will make Aucklanders’ in particular look back and weep with desire for the old days.

It was the days of the space race when the Russians held the upper hand with the first Sputnik and then the first dog, Laika, in space. It was a time of star gazing to see the satellites crossing the cosmos and the wonder that man could be so clever. We don’t think like that now.

Johnny Devlin topped the hit parade with Lawdey Miss Clawdy an Elvis song and girls tore the shirt off his back in public appearances. Where are you now Johnny? I haven’t got your record but I have Elvis’s.

A section could be purchased for 600 pounds and a new house built for 2000 pounds and the ordinary NZ working man could buy a house. Fat chance these days.

In between time The Auckland Harbour Bridge was constructed with British steel and built by overseas workers from the British Isles and elsewhere along with our own workers. Danger money was paid as were bonuses for meeting targets and no mention of minimum wages. Try getting that these days.

Simon and his best mate are in a pretty young teachers class in form 1 or year 7 as we call it now on the North Shore where everyone went to work on the ferries. She encourages them to keep a diary and Simon does so for the whole year from february 1958 till 30th August 1959.

He documents the progress of the bridge construction and the life of his family particularly his sensitive sister Linda who hates the cruelty to animals in the space race. i never thought of that at the time.

In the back are photographs of the bridge in various phases and the diary shows highlights of the construction. A timeline is given and this makes a very appealing novel for primary and intermediate students. Even better for older students like me who can look back at the good old days.

Well researched and told by Philippa Werry.

The Island of Lost Horses by Stacey Gregg.

November 12, 2014 Comments off

island lost horsesThe Island of Lost Horses by Stacey Gregg. Pub. HarperCollins, 2014.

Not many people will have heard of the Abaco Barb horse, the rarest breed in the World. Stacey Gregg has and she has written another of her impressive horse stories with an historical context. This time it is about Christopher Columbus on his quest to the New World at a time when Spain was living in fear of the Spanish Inquisition and Jews were being persecuted not for the first or last time.

Stacey Gregg links 12 year old Beatriz a present day girl who is sailing with her marine biologist mother studying jellyfish in the warm seas around the Bahamas. Lucky girl. With a story of a girl Felipa from the year 1492. A girl who keeps a diary of her life.

While anchored near an island Beatriz sees a horse with top hat markings and is drawn to the horse. While chasing  the horse she both are caught in a life and death struggle in mudflats and are rescued by and old woman named Annie.

It becomes clear that Beatriz and the horse are fated to be together and this attraction has roots in the history of Christopher Columbus. Felipa’s  diary  tells a story of persecution and flight to the New World with a top hat marked horse on one of Columbus’s ships. Is there a link between the two girls?

I really like Stacey Gregg’s novels. They have good values, strong girl characters and great adventure and of course horses. Can the rare Abaco barb horse species be saved and of course there is a hurricane.  Wonderful ending.

Reluctant girls of primary and intermediate school age love them. This year another of Gregg’s novels The Princess and the Foal won children’s choice at the NZ Post Book Awards. This novel is just as good.

Dork Diaries Book 6: Holiday heartbreak by Rachel Renee Russell

June 3, 2013 Comments off

DorkDork Diaries Book 6: Holiday Heartbreak by Rachel Renee Russell. Pub. Simon $ Schuster, 2013.

I have already reviewed a Dork Diaries book earlier in this blog and decided to put the latest one on the blog because it is such a laugh with appeal to reluctant pre teen girl readers and they exist. It is not just the boys.

Nikki keeps a diary of her life and she always talks about her home life especially her younger sister Brianna who has a furtive imagination and her school life. Chloe and Zoey are her closest friends and very supportive friends they are and they won’t let her get away with wooly thinking and acting.

Number one enemy is  Mackenzie a shark in lip gloss, skinny jeans and platform heels. Mackenzie is the type of mean rich girl that seems to haunt American High schools. This time she wants Brandon, the near perfect boy, who likes Nikki and she has a crush on him. Oh heartbreak!

Valentines Day dance is to be a girls ask the boys dance. There is drama ahead. Not only that they have to elect a teen princess at the dance. Who will win? I hope it is not Brandon.

Easy to read with high girl appeal. It is a wet day and I had no problem in putting it all aside for this novel.

My NZ Story: Pandemic by Sally Stone

November 5, 2012 Comments off

Pandemic: Spanish Flu 1918 by Sally Stone. Pub. Scholastic, 2012. 

The 18th My Story novel ironically about the events from August to December 1918 covering the end of World War 1 and the Spanish Flu that ravaged the World killing more than 50 million people. In NZ 8,600 people died with more than a quarter of them Maori.

The story is told in diary format by 11 year old red haired Freda, a spirited girl who doesn’t miss a trick. She grows up on a farm in Canterbury outside Christchurch, with her dour father, downtrodden mother, brother Bobby who goes to war, and a grandmother who is a harbinger of doom in a comical sense.

Sally Stone not only tells the story of these tense days but gives an excellent portrait of life in these times that will astound today’s kids. She touches on corporal punishment in the classroom, children should be seen and not heard, marbles, housework of the most arduous kind, churning butter, making soap and swagmen coming to the door for a feed.

All told using the idiom of the day. The flu was even written into skipping rhymes -:I had a little bird its name was Enza, I opened the window and in-flu-enza”. Just brilliant.

The returned soldiers, prohibition and all the measures taken because of the flu are starkly presented in chipper fashion by Freda.

Great for primary and intermediate age children and easily read because of the short diary entries. Excellent history with photographs and historytimeline in the back. History is more powerful when it is personnalised like the books in this series.