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Posts Tagged ‘Imagination’

Don’t drink the Pink by B.C.R. Fegan, illus. Lenny Wen.

July 5, 2019 Comments off

drink pinkDon’t drink the Pink by B.C.R. Fegan , illus. Lenny Wen.

An unusual yet compelling picture book about the relationship between Madeline and her grandfather who her parents regard as both crazy and old. Of course he is a bit of both but mostly he cares about Madeline.

On her birthday from age 1 to 15 grandfather gives her a coloured potion with a warning “don’t drink the pink”. Each year the coloured potion has a different effect on Madeline from making her breath fire to becoming invisible and walking through walls but not harmful. Gee I wish I had a grandfather like that.

The mystery what will happen when she does drink the Pink? Read it and find out.

The illustrations create a homely yet mysterious atmosphere and also support the other themes of counting and colour. The rhyming text is both repetitive and imaginative. An interesting package this.

The Incurable Imagination by Paul Russell, illus. Aska

May 9, 2019 Comments off

incurableThe Incurable Imagination by Paul Russell, illus. Aska, Pub. Exisle Publishing 2019.

If you let your imagination get away on you where will it end? Audrey was born with imagination and as she grew older she spread it around in her home, at school and with her friends.

It became so overwhelming that it spread into the community and people started smiling at each other in the street. All because of one little girl. Perhaps imagination is not a bad disease to have.

Read this great picture book for juniors and find out where Audrey’s imagination takes her. A good read aloud with illustrations that will have you smiling.

The Box Cars by Robert Vescio, illus. by Cara King

May 9, 2019 Comments off

boxcarsThe Box Cars by Robert Vescio, illus. by Cara King. Pub. Exisle Publishing 2016.

Kai and Liam are imaginitive boys. They build box cars that they use to chase criminals, carry movie stars and pick up passengers. Then Eve comes along. Three into two doesn’t go and when they try to cope, catastrophe.

Nobody is happy but then they come up with a new idea and everybody is happy. I wonder what it is? Read it and find out.

A picture book about imagination and sharing. How would we get on without these two qualities?

Simple text that harmonises with the illustrations that show the emotions of joy, frustration and ultimately happiness..

Little Frida by Anthony Browne

April 6, 2019 Comments off

Little fridaLittle Frida by Anthony Browne. Pub. Walker Books, 2019.

A new Anthony Browne picture book is something to savour, and this one about the young Frida Kahlo is a beauty.

Frida was only 6 years old when she contracted polio. It was painful and made her different from other children. She felt lonely and an outsider and when she dreamed she dreamed of flying.

She retreated into her imagination and flew away meeting a girl who was just like her, except she could dance. Frida told her all her secrets, she listened and they became the closest of friends. She knew she could visit her whenever she wanted and she did.

Brilliant story about the power and healing qualities of the imagination. It is a powerful story.

The illustrations are as always outstanding. Full of mystery and meaning while capturing Frida’s sadness and pain and the Mexican landscape from whence she came. There is the airplane made of fruit, a little dog that appears on most pages and the wings that Frida wore disappearing mysteriously.

Check it out, you will not get better quality writing and illustration than this.

Lola Dutch. When I Grow Up by Kenneth & Sarah Jane Wright

January 25, 2019 Comments off

lola dutchLola Dutch. When I Grow Up by Kenneth & Sarah Jane Wright. Pub. Bloomsbury, 2019.

Lola Dutch is inventive, she is imaginative and best of all she is confident. She puts her mind to the task of deciding what she is going to do when she grows up.

She tests her ideas out on her animal friends – Bear, crocodile, pig and crane. They of course let her run with her ideas and help her in every way possible as she imagines being on the stage, an inventor, a botanist an Egyptologist and many other things.

Bear puts his finger on the pulse “Lola what do you want to be right now?” Lola’s answer is the key to the whole story. Check it and find out why.

Simple text, complimentary water colour illustrations and a heroine to be admired.

Whispers by Greg Howard.

January 11, 2019 Comments off

9780241367087-1-edition.default.original-1 webWhispers by Greg Howard. Pub. Penguin Random House, 2019.

This novel for gifted intermediate readers and secondary school students, is a slow burner. It takes a while to get into it, but once it takes off, you will be hooked.

Eleven year old Riley James lives with his father and older brother in a deeply religious country community in South Carolina. There is no room to be different in this community and Riley knows that he is. He has the same feeling for boys that most boys have for girls. He is by his own admission a mummy’s boy and he clashes with his gun-toting elder brother Danny and with his father.

Crisis comes when his mother disappears and the police are constantly questioning Riley about it. He says he can remember nothing but events in this story, particularly a Stand By Me type camping trip into the woods with some other boys, jog his memory.

At the beginning of the novel is a story about Whispers told to Riley by his mother. When she disappears he retreats into his imagination and creates a bizarre fantasy explanation about things in life based on the whispers story, but reality is close at hand.

Where has his mother gone? Is she still alive? and what about his awakening sexuality? Read this intense novel and find out.

The Restless Girls by Jessie Burton, illus. Angela Barrett.

October 16, 2018 Comments off

restless girlsThe Restless Girls by Jessie Burton, illus. Angela Barrett. Pub. Bloomsbury Children’s Books, 2018.

From the people that brought you Harry Potter comes this superb hardback novel that is old yet new at the same time.

It is old because it is about a king with 12 daughters who believes girls are not as important as boys and shouldn’t have license to explore their talents and imagination. It is new because the girls will not be subjected to the king’s decisions and use imagination to change things.

After their bright and breezy mother, Queen Laurelia is killed in a car accident while driving around the beautiful kingdom of Kalia, the King, Alberto, goes into grieving and takes away all the rights and privileges from his 12 daughters. The Palace becomes like a morgue and the girls are unhappy.

Led by eldest and very intelligent and creative daughter Princess Frida, the Princesses use imagination to visit a wondrous land where they party and dance till dawn. Unfortunately the dancing wears their shoes out and poses a mystery that the king needs to solve.

When the girls refuse to tell him how their shoes became worn he banishes Frida from the kingdom and offers one of his daughters and the crown of Kalia to any man who can solve the problem. Find out what happens, it is brilliant.

The illustrations are superb and leave room for your own imagination. Easy to read for primary and intermediate students. Adults will love it too.