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Posts Tagged ‘individuality’

Hannibal. The camel who longed to be special by Pauline Marshall. illus. Candice Haare-Smith.

February 1, 2018 Comments off

hannibalHannibal. The camel who longed to be special by Pauline Marshall. illus. Candice Haare-Smith. Pub. 2018

Good manners dictate that one eats with ones mouth closed. Hannibal the camel doesn’t do this, no camel does. Their flubbery lips flap, their jaws swing and whatever they are eating sprays around like a sandstorm. That’s what being a camel is all about.

Hannibal is not happy with this and he wants to impress the lovely Cleo. He consults a number of others including Dugg the dung beetle, Oz the ostrich and human beings. He just makes himself look silly but he has a lot of fun doing it.

Then he discovers something about Cleo that changes everything. Read it and see what it is.

First time illustrator Candice Haare-Smith does a splendid job with acrylic and watercolour illustrations that capture the camels image and manner. The eyes are particularly important because through the eyes you can see the soul.

Lovely story about identity and individuality for juniors either to read alone or for an adult to read aloud.

Purchase on Amazon.

Erik. The lone Wolf by Sarah Finan.

January 19, 2018 Comments off

erik wolfErik. The lone Wolf by Sarah Finan. Pub. Allen & Unwin, 2018.

This picture book impressed me the minute I picked it up, before I even  opened it up to see what was inside. The cover was done in a relief type of art. The title stuck out from cover you could feel it like a blind person. So did Erik with his red scarf and the mountains as well. It was lovely to rub my hands across it.

Inside the written text and illustrations did not disappoint either. I do admire author/illustrators.

It is about belonging and feeling crowded at the same time. Erik is sick of being with the pack and being told to do this and not to do that. He takes off on his own.

At first the freedom is exhilarating but then trouble, Erik is in the deep stuff. Fortunately the pack haven’t left Erik and they rescue him and he is so glad to be back. Sometimes people do not appreciate you till you’re gone and vice versa. Lots of positive messages about this work.

Great to read aloud and to read on your own. A real beauty, don’t miss this one.

Categories: Picture book Tags: ,

The Little Cloud by Beverley Burch & Elspeth Nicol

February 16, 2017 Comments off

little-cloudThe Little Cloud by Beverley Burch & Elspeth Nicol. Pub. Makaro Press, 2017.

A blast from the past in terms of style of writing, presentation and illustrations. It was written in 1959, forgotten, rediscovered in 2014 and revamped for today’s market. A jolly good job too.

It is very much a story book that you could read to a class of juniors or individually read by years 3 & 4.

It is a story of a little cloud who is part of a big storm cloud that is bringing wind and rain to Wellington. The little cloud longs to be on his own in fine weather and when he gets his chance and goes further up the North Island he finds a parched land in need of rain.

Little cloud learns to cry and bring rain, chases an aeroplane and falls on top of Mt Taranaki happy to know he has become a real cloud.

The illustrations are in both black and white and colour, presenting the New Zealand landscape as it was in 1959. The picture on the cover is  totally different from the others looking very much like something Bob Kerr might have done. The effect is extraordinary and enhances the book.

Check this little gem out you might never see another. A short history of the authors in the back makes for interesting reading.

I Am Henry Finch by Alexis Deacon, Illus. Viviane Schwarz.

December 4, 2014 Comments off

henry finchI Am Henry Finch by Alexis Deacon, Illus. Viviane Schwarz. Pub. Walker Books, 2014.

Descartes once said “I think therefore I am”. Henry Finch does the same and shows that an individual can change things for everybody.

Every morning all the finches wake up and say good morning to each other. The noise is deafening but reassuring. The greetings are repeated in the afternoon and in the evening. The only drama in the day of a finch is when the monster comes and tries to eat a few. Finches be wary.

One night Henry Finch had a thought. He knew who he was and fantasizes that he could be great. To show the other finches he attacks the monster and is eaten.

Inside the monster he has more thoughts and pulls himself together. When he emerges from the monster he is a hero and about to start a bigger change in the finches. I will leave it to you to decide what happens. Glorious stuff.

Illustrator Viviane Schwarz has enhanced the text with an amazing and simple technique. She has used orange finger and thumb prints with black ink lines to illustrate the finches. The effect is stunning. The monster is watercolour blue/green and when things get dark inside the monster for Henry Finch and his thoughts, black and white  does the job.

Amusing and thought provoking for the older reader and a great story with drama for the juniors.

Henry Finch is a true hero.