Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Maori language’

Ma Wai E Hautu? by Leo Timmers.

August 6, 2020 Comments off

ma wai e hautuMa Wai E Hautu? by Leo Timmers. Pub. Gecko press, 2020.

This is an unusual board book in Maori language but it is funny and the illustrations are a treat to behold.

The left hand page always has the same four words which translate as we are the helpers. Then the right hand page has a fire engine, a blue car, a yellow racing car, a tractor and a number of other means of transport.

However the most valuable part is that each page introduces a wild animal with it’s Maori name. I wonder if many people know that Arewhana means elephant or kakiroa means giraffe.

A board book for juniors and pre schoolers which helps them learn the Maori language.

I talked to my Maori neighbour about the translation and she thought it was fun.

Kia Kaha. Together standing strong by June Pitman-Hayes & Minky Stapleton. Maori lyrics by Ngaere Roberts.

April 23, 2020 Comments off

Kia KahaKia Kaha. Together standing strong by June Pitman-Hayes & Minky Stapleton. Maori lyrics by Ngaere Roberts. Pub. Scholastic, 2020.

Kia Kaha means be brave , stand strong and this multi cultural picture book with sound track on a CD displays this from a child’s point of view.

Children are less inhibited when it comes to race relations and dealing with disabilities. A hurt knee because of a fall is just as painful whether you are brown, black, muslim or oriental. Kis kaha is what we say when someone needs a helping hand.

The musical CD is easy to sing along to and the story is told in both Maori and English.

Thew illustrations are positive, simple and appealing. A great picture book for getting along together.

Nanny Mihi and the Rainbow by Melanie Drewery Illus. Tracy Duncan

November 13, 2019 Comments off

nanny mihiNanny Mihi and the Rainbow by Melanie Drewery Illus. Tracy Duncan. Pub. Oratia, 2019.

A reprint of this best selling picture book with all-new illustrations and printing.

Nanny Mihi has a whare (house) on the coast and every year her moko ma (grand children) visit her on their holidays. Nanny Mihi has them gathering different coloured shells, berries, flowers and other natural items and aligning them on the beach.

Each colour which reflects the colours of the rainbow is in Maori and English with a different colour collected on a different day of the weak. The days of the weak are also in Maori and English.

When a storm erodes their beach display Nanny Mihi tells the children that the Atua (gods) will repay in another way and after the storm sure enough a rainbow appears across the bay.

Lovely story and impressive illustrations that reflect the natural world and of course those expressive brown eyes of Nanny Mihi and the children.

Rugby 1 2 3. Whutuporo Tahi Rua Toru by Thalia Kehoe Rowden, illus. Myles Lawford. Na Ngaere Roberts i Whakamaori.

September 11, 2019 Comments off

rugby 123Rugby 1 2 3. Whutuporo Tahi Rua Toru by Thalia Kehoe Rowden, illus. Myles Lawford. Na Ngaere Roberts i Whakamaori. Pub. Scholastic, 2019.

What better way to celebrate Maori Language week and on the eve of the Rugby World Cup, than a bi-lingual picture book on rugby and counting.

It celebrates the playing and supporting of the game of rugby at school level in New Zealand/Aotearoa and counting up to 10. The text rhymes and the illustrations are positive, racially and gender balanced, and it is fun.

One of the best.

Keep Fit Kiwi. Head and Shoulders, Knees and Toes by Lynette Evans, illus. Steve Mahardhike, Sung by Pio Terei, Maori lyrics by Ngaere Roberts.

December 1, 2018 Comments off

fit kiwiKeep Fit Kiwi. Head and Shoulders, Knees and Toes by Lynette Evans, illus. Steve Mahardhike, Sung by Pio Terei, Maori lyrics by Ngaere Roberts. Pub. Scholastic, 2018.

Scholastic are becoming noted for their children’s books that catch onto popular songs that can be sung by children and combining it with a way to learn and understand Maori language. But better still they are fun.

In this one kiwi, lamb puppy, alpaca and rabbit are put through their fitness paces while singing the lyrics to head and shoulders, knees and toes. Then they do the whole thing again in Maori language.

The illustrations are happy and funny and the song is easy to follow and well sung by Pio Terei.

Great for Xmas and a useful tool in the classroom.

Kanohi, Kararehe and Kakahu by Kitty Brown and Kirsten Parkinson

June 5, 2016 Comments off

kanohiKanohi, Kararehe and Kakahu by Kitty Brown and Kirsten Parkinson. Pub. http://www.reopepi.co.nz  2016

These three Reo Pepi baby language board books are superb. Some of the finest bilingual books for all the whanau but especially for pre school children that i have ever come across.

Each has 8 pages that will withstand chewing and heaving about.

The written text is by Kitty Brown on every left facing page. The text consists  of a Maori Language phrase in dark black thick letters and below this is the English translation.

At the back of the book is a pronunciation Guide for the vowels both with and without macrons. Beside these is a three column Glossaryin Maori, how the words are phonetically pronounced and the English translation.

kakahuIt is the illustrations that are the star attraction of these bilingual pukapuka. Kirsten Parkinson’s whole page portaraits are perceptive, funny and warm. The colours are aptly chosen and the background details appropriate and without clutter.

Kanohi or My Face asks questions such as Kei hea to upoko or where is your head? and has a baby with hand on top of head. The nose, teeth, mouth, ears, tongue, eyes and lips are covered. delightful.

Kakahu or getting dressed has children putting on their tops, trousers, socks, jacket, hat, scarf,and shoes. All have delightful cheeky faces.

Kararehe or Animals features a sheep with wanto eyes, a proud colourful chicken, a dole eyed puppy, a knowing horse, a whimsical cat a rascally pig, a wary rabbit and a ho kararehehum cow. Superb illustrations.

Everyone could benefit from looking at these three titles. I hope there are more coming.

Categories: Junior Fiction Tags: