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Archive for the ‘Junior Fiction’ Category

The World’s Worst Children 3 by David Walliams illus. Tony Ross.

June 20, 2018 Comments off

worst children3The World’s Worst Children 3 by David Walliams illus. Tony Ross. Pub. HarperCollins, 2018.

I don’t really need to review this book because kids will already know about it, but I do so for all those kids who would rather make monkey noises than sing xmas carols(I.m one of those), or those who stick all their bogeys together so that they look like a huge green icicle, then eat them.

Yes it is ten more horrible children who throw tantrums, do pranks, are overly bossy, kung fu everything and generally make life intolerable for those around them. Sure it is well over the top but we all know the type.

My favourite is Walter the Wasp a short arsed bully with a sharp nose and a wit that cuts like a knife. He is out to win bully of the year trophy which is a gold statuette depicting a bully giving a smaller child a wedgie.

There is always a seriousness about David Walliam’s books, he hates cheats, bullies, public school twits and the gap between rich and poor.

I love his books and you will too. This man has done more to get reluctant kids to read than anybody since J.K. Rowling. Illustrated brilliantly once again in colour by Tony Ross.

Being a Princess is Very Hard Work by Sarah Kilbride, illus. Ada Grey.

May 26, 2018 Comments off

princessBeing a Princess is Very Hard Work by Sarah Kilbride, illus. Ada Grey. Pub. Bloomsbury, 2018.

What do parents say to a girl, or a boy for that matter, who wants to be a princess? Well in this glorious picture book the parents take two stances.

Firstly they point out what princesses have to do. They have to look interested all day when they are bored out of their trees. They have to look good all the time and run in long dresses. They cannot stick their tongues out or make a face and must finish their dinners even with greens. Then there is dealing with knights and dragons and no farting or burping. Sounds horrendous.

But that is not enough really so secondly they say how much they love the little girl for what she is already. But you will have to read that part for yourself.

Fabulous illustrations that fully compliment the rhyming text and with a great sense of humour. We all need some silliness in our lives.

The Day the War Came by Nicola Davies, illus. Rebecca Cobb.

May 25, 2018 Comments off

day war cameThe Day the War Came by Nicola Davies, illus. Rebecca Cobb. Pub. Walker Books, 2018.

This is one of the most powerful and moving picture books I have ever read and you will be moved too.

It is narrated by a little girl who wears the same clothes from beginning to end. It starts with family happiness around the breakfast table, moves to school where the little girl is learning about volcanoes, drawing birds and singing about tadpoles turning into frogs.

Then the war comes in a devastating series of images that has the little girls home and town bombed to the stone age. Her journey to a safe haven follows but the war comes with her in her mind and in the attitudes of the people she encounters.

She is eventually refused entry to a school because there isn’t a chair for her, but as is usually the case children come to the rescue. Read it and find out how.

Rebecca Cobb’s illustrations are stunning especially the coming of the war, helicopters in the sky, the bomb crater of the little girls home. Then on the journey away lonely shoes on the beach.

The written text will make you cry. The repeated school scene is powerful.

Superb.

The Visitor by Anjte Damm.

May 19, 2018 Comments off

The Visitor by Anjte Damm. Pub. Gecko Press, 2018.

visitorWhat a brilliantly conceived and perceptive picture book about fear and loneliness this is.

Illustrated using photographs with cardboard cutout figures inserted, it tells the story of a lonely old lady who never goes outside because she is scared. The photographs are gloomy and she is gloomy.

Then a paper plane comes through her window which exacerbates her fears until a small boy knocks on her door and makes himself at home. he is bright and breezy and wears his cap on backwards

She tells him her name is Elise and he is Emil. He asks her to read to him from her library from which she has read every book. He brings colour into her life. He tells her that her house is cool.

The last double paged illustration in the book is majorly different from the identical illustration at the start. Read it and see how, you will not be disappointed.

The written text is simple, well place in the illustrations and wise beyond belief.

Miniwings. Firestorm’s Musical Muck-up by Sally Sutton, Illus. Kirsten Richards

May 19, 2018 Comments off

miniwingsMiniwings. Firestorm’s Musical Muck-up by Sally Sutton, Illus. Kirsten Richards. Pub. Scholastic, 2018.

This is the first of a new series mainly for girls who are getting more confident with reading.

It is about two sisters who play a flute and a violin and see six miniature horses that originally where given by their grandmother but come alive when adults are out of the room. Each horse has it’s own personality and this story is about Firestorm who lives up to his name.

The girls are doing a concert with their class for their parents and friends and organised by their teacher Miss Rose, who doesn’t have a boyfriend. Things start to go wrong when Firestorm pushes the fire alarm but will it get Miss Rose a boyfriend.

A good mix of fantasy and everyday hassles and problems. Written with gusto and plenty of humour and well illustrated by Kirsten Richards who captures all the moments and gives character to the Miniwings.

Categories: Fantasy, Junior Fiction Tags: ,

Goat’s Coat by Tom Percival Illus. Christine Pym.

May 16, 2018 Comments off

goats coatGoat’s Coat by Tom Percival Illus. Christine Pym. Pub. Bloomsbury, 2018.

Goat is a good guy with a caring attitude towards his fellow man or animals in this case. He is also well chuffed with his new coat which has a collar “the colour of freshly cut grass”. Just the thing to keep him warm and to proudly show off to his friends.

Goat however is bigger than his pride. When a family of frogs, a kitten and a chick get in a spot of bother Goat uses his coat to sort it out, at his own expense. As the coat shrinks, the weather worsens and goat is in trouble himself.

Ah but his friends remember. I wonder what they will do? Read it and find out.

This is the world the way it should be.

Great bright colourful illustrations and rhyming text. A great read-aloud and discussion starter for juniors.

Along Came a Different by Tom McLaughlin.

May 15, 2018 Comments off

differentAlong Came a Different by Tom McLaughlin. Pub.Bloomsbury, 2018.

This outstanding picture book discusses racism, prejudice and difference in the most simplest of ways – using colours and shapes.

The Reds are first on the scene with their red hats, songs and apples. Then came the yellows with their bananas and they didn’t like the Reds because their hats were too pointy and music too loud. They divided the territory up, then the Blues turned up with their bow ties and twangy guitars.

Nobody liked each other and things got sillier and sillier. So they drew up rules. Being friends was banned.

Something has got to give and then something really different shows up. See what they do.

Superb illustrations using colours of course with large written text some of it in dark black for emphasis.

Excellent read aloud and superb message. Why can’t we all be friends?